The Candida Expert

Posts tagged ‘Diabetes’

Candida Linked To Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, Psoriasis, and Other Autoimmune Conditions

In this recent study, Candida albicans was shown to cause inflammatory and autoimmune reactions that lead to arthritis, psoriasis and other skin rashes, multiple sclerosis, and many other conditions and diseases – http://candidaplan.com/blog/620/candida-linked-to-arthritis-multiple-sclerosis-psoriasis-and-other-autoimmune-conditions/

VISIT OUR NEW BLOG AT – www.candidaplan.com/blog

Advertisements

Candida, Fruit, and Dr. McCombs Candida Plan

When I developed the McCombs Plan about 20 years ago, I was fortunate enough NOT to be familiar with the anti-candida programs or books that were around. That meant that I could discover for myself what worked and what didn’t work for my patients. Three years later, I started getting questions from my patients about why this or why not that.

The Plan as it had been developed was very successful from the beginning and is still the original Plan as it is laid out today. One of the common questions that I received was why – http://candidaplan.com/blog/432/candida-fruit-and-dr-mccombs-candida-plan/

Can You Eat Too Many Healthy Fruits and Veggies?

Is it possible to overeat healthy foods? I guess that would depend on the context. The point of the article below is that it is possible to consume too many calories and gain weight, regardless of whether the food is healthy or not. Contrary to this type of logic however, when doing Dr. McCombs Candida Plan – http://candidaplan.com/, we find that eating plenty actually helps to increase weight loss. This is due to the fact that detoxifying the body takes lots of energy and you need to fuel this process. Many people comment that they “haven’t eaten this much in years and they’re still losing weight,” which brings us back to context. Here’s the short article anyway – http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724144423.htm

It may make you scratch your head, but in fact it is possible to overeat healthy foods, according to Loyola University Health System registered dietitian Brooke Schantz.

“While fruits are nutritious, too much of even a healthy food can lead to weight gain,” Schantz said. “The key is to remember to control the portion sizes of the foods you consume.”

Schantz reported that overeating healthy foods is easy to do, but the same rules apply to healthy food as junk food. Weight fluctuates based on a basic concept — energy in versus energy out. If your total caloric intake is higher than the energy you burn off in a day, you will gain weight. If it is lower, you will lose weight.

“I have had many patients tell me that they don’t know why they are not losing weight,” Schantz said. “Then they report that they eat fruit all day long. They are almost always shocked when I advise them to watch the quantity of food they eat even if it is healthy.”

Schantz said that one exception applies. Nonstarchy vegetables are difficult to overeat unless they are accompanied by unnecessary calories from sauces, cheeses and butter. This is due to the high water and fiber content of these vegetables coupled with the stretching capacity of the stomach. The vegetables she suggested limiting are those that are high in starch, such as peas, corn and potatoes. Foods that are labeled as fat-free or low-fat are another area of concern.

“People tend to give themselves the freedom to overeat ‘healthy’ foods,” Schantz said. “While the label might say that a food or beverage is low-fat or fat-free, watch the quantity you consume and refrain from eating an excessive amount. Foods that carry these health claims may be high in sugar and calories.”

Context, context, context!

Does Candida Know When To Attack

There is always a wealth of information coming forth that helps to provide greater clarity on how candida becomes problematic in the body. This recent study, as reported in Science Daily, provides some good information and some confusing information. I’ll add some editorial throughout the article – http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724153651.htm

The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans inconspicuously lives in our bodies until it senses that we are weak when it quickly adapts to go on the offensive. The fungus, known for causing yeast and other minor infections, also causes a sometimes-fatal infection known as candidemia in immunocompromised patients An in vivo study, published in mBio, demonstrates how C. albicanscan distinguish between a healthy and an unhealthy host and alter its physiology to attack. [There are several factors that cause the conversion of the normal yeast form of candida to its pathogenic, problematic fungal form – pH, temperature, antibiotics, bacterial cell wall components, etc., The phrase, “senses we are weak” isn’t something that I have ever seen in scientific studies, but it may be another way to state immunsuppression. Even so, I have yet to see that listed as a trigger for yeast-to-fungal conversion. Immunosuppression can play a role in the spread of candida, but some studies indicate that it isn’t a pre-requisite for this to happen. Candidemia is another term for fungal sepsis, or blood-borne fungal infection. Sepsis is one of the top 10 or 11 leading causes of death in the United States, depending on year of reference, and fungal candida causes over 50% of that].

“The ability of the fungus to sense the immune status of its host may be key to its ability to colonize harmlessly in some people but become a deadly pathogen in others,” said Jessica V. Pierce, BA, PhD student in the molecular microbiology program at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts. [This is an interesting quote from an author in the study. It can be taken a couple of different ways. It might be interpreted that she is stating that it spreads throughout the body in its fungal form in the presence of an intact immune system, but doesn’t create any imbalances. That would be ignoring a lot of other research that demonstrates how the fungal form of candida creates many imbalances within the body. It has been shown to spread through the body without the immune system being compromised. A second interpretation and the one that I believe she is stating is that as a fungus, it colonizes the digestive tract harmlessly or pathogenically depending on the host immune status. That would ignore the fact that candida colonizes the intestinal tract in its yeast form. It may not be much of a differentiation, but it can be misleading as the fungal form is problematic and the yeast form isn’t.]

“Effective detection and treatment of disease in immunocompromised patients could potentially work by targeting the levels of a protein, Efg1p, that we found influenced the growth of Candida albicans inside the host,” she continued. [As stated before, there are several factors that cause the conversion of yeast-to-fungus. Efg1 has been identified previously as part of the internal mechanism that regulates the yeast-to-hyphal conversion and back again. It’s not the only part and its presence may not be a good indicator of fungal infections, as it can exist in the yeast form also.]

The researchers knew from previous research that Efg1p influences the expression of genes that regulate how harmful a fungal cell can become. Surprisingly, the investigators found that lower Efg1p levels allow the fungal cells to grow to high levels inside a host. Higher levels of the protein result in less growth. [Would the high levels be associated with it’s yeast form and the low levels with its fungal form. That can be a good reason for differentiating between yeast and fungus and not referring to both forms as though they were fungal.]

To examine how the immune status could affect the growth of C. albicans within a host, the researchers fed both healthy and immunocompromised mice equal amounts of two fungal strains containing two different levels of the Efg1p protein.

Fecal pellets from the mice were tested to determine which strain of fungi thrived. In a healthy host, the fungal cells with higher levels of the protein predominated.

In immunocompromised mice, the fungal cells with lower levels of the protein flourished. The researchers noted that lack of interactions with immune cells in the intestinal tract most likely caused the necessary environmental conditions favoring fungal cells that express lower levels of the protein, resulting in fungal overgrowth and setting the stage for systemic infection.

“By having a mixed population with some high Efg1p cells and some low Efg1p cells, the fungus can adjust its physiology to remain benign or become harmful when it colonizes hosts with varying immune statuses. These findings are important because they provide the first steps toward developing more effective methods for detecting and treating serious and stubborn infections caused by Candida albicans, such as candidemia,” said Carol A. Kumamoto, PhD, professor of molecular biology and microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine and member of the molecular microbiology and genetics program faculties at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences.

The immune system and “good bacteria” within the body act to regulate the size of C. albicans fungal populations in healthy individuals. When the immune system is compromised, the fungus can spread throughout the body. Candidemia, i.e. blood-borne Candida, is the fourth most common blood infection among hospitalized patients in the United States and is found in immunocompromised patients such as babies, those with catheters, and the critically ill. [Here we see the authors state that it is the immune system and the “good bacteria” that help to regulate the candida populations. This would be a very strong statement against the use of antibiotics, as antibiotics destroy the “good bacteria” and suppress the immune system. With Sepsis being one of the top causes of death in the United States and over 50% of that being due to fungal candida, much of that can be prevented by not using antibiotics. That would eliminate sepsis as a leading cause of death and fungal candida as the 4th leading cause of hospital infections. Throughout this article I didn’t see any differentiation between the yeast and fungal forms of candida and I didn’t find it mentioned in the original abstract either. Many studies seem to be limited in the breadth of understanding of candida and the vast amount of past research. Through other studies, it has already been established that immunosuppression is not necessary for the spread of candida. For more research on this, view the Candida Facts Sheet article.  Tests can only serve as indicators, not absolute measures of function in the body. Targeting something like Efg1 doesn’t seem to be a promising advancement in the understanding or treatment of candida. If the purpose is to create another target for antifungal medications, it must be remembered that all medications contain far more harmful effects than beneficial effects. One common effect of antifungal medications  is immunosuppression.

A Time For Transformation: A Short Film By The McCombs Center For Health

We’re proud to announce our new short film, A Time For Transformation.

Watch the short 2-minute trailer here:

Visit our website to enjoy the full-length video (about 33 minutes):

http://ATimeForTransformation.com

“A Time for Transformation” was born out of our desire to share who we are and why we do what we do. We believe health is inherent in all of us, and that health and hope go hand-in-hand.

There are many pathways to health and living a life of infinite possibility. Our hope is that this film encourages you to take your first step, or shines some light on the path you’ve already chosen.

Whatever step you choose, we support you and wish you the very best in health.

– The McCombs Center for Health Family

Blood Sugar Balance Protocol

Do you have a blood sugar imbalance? 

For balancing the ecosystem of the intestinal tract and the body, I recommend doing the Candida Plan. If you have blood sugar imbalances, you should address these also at the same time.

If you get tired, irritable, sleepy, or moody when you go too long without food, you most likely have a low blood sugar issue (hypoglycemia).

Hypoglycemia can affect the following:

  • estrogen
  • progesterone
  • testosterone
  • and thyroid hormones
  • suppress the immune system
  • cause adrenal fatigue
  • sugar cravings
  • promote inflammation
  • cause various disturbances in the nervous system
  • such as anxiety
  • depression
  • nervousness
  • brain fog, etc.

Many people will have both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia/insulin resistance (tired after meals) during the day. This protocol helps with both.

Blood Sugar Balance Protocol

You’ll need to eat at least a small handful of food every 45-60 minutes (60 minutes usually works). That can be 1/3 of a celery stick or carrot, ¼ of an apple, ½ of an avocado, a rice cake, a meal, some veggies, etc., to keep your blood sugar balanced.

Keep snacks handy at all times

It is very important that you follow this strictly, as almost doesn’t work. Anyone with problems handling fruit, should stick to celery, meats, avocado, etc., for snacks. Celery is very easy to prepare and carry with you and can supply 10% of your body’s energy for the day.

Plan your day around having enough snacks with you at all times. As an example – if you wake up at 7am, eat a piece of celery right away, then get ready for the day and eat breakfast at 8am, then snack at 9, 10, 11; lunch at 12; snack at 1, 2, 3, 4; dinner at 5; snack at 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; bedtime. Snack all the way up to bedtime. Have a snack as soon as you get up, then go about getting ready for your day and making breakfast. If you wake up in the middle of the night, keep a piece of celery on the nightstand and have it before going back to sleep.

It is important to do this for at least 4 months. Additionally, it’s important to start the day with protein and have protein at every meal. Visit my website for meal planning tips and healthy recipes.

If you have questions about the Blood Sugar Balance Protocolclick here to contact me through my website.


Fungal Arthritis

I’ve just added this article to the Candida Library and thought you should know about it since over 40 million Americans are affected by some form of arthritis.

Fungal arthritis

Marta L Cuellar, Luis H Silveira, Luis R Espinoza

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 1992

Why This Article Matters

“There is never a lack of research or information available about the pervasiveness of fungal infections in our society today. There is however, a lack of awareness that this is an ongoing problem in society at all ages, as this research article demonstrates. Fungal infections can cause arthritis of any joint in the body. When treated properly, fungal arthritis cases improve and disappear. The use of antibiotics continues to be the primary cause of this problem, followed by, or in conjunction with steroid use. The best approach is to avoid these problems by avoiding use of these medications whenever possible.” – Dr. Jeff McCombs, DC

Excerpted from the research article:

Although healthy subjects may host fungal diseases, various predisposing factors that depress the immune system have been implicated in most patients developing fungal infections or fungal arthritis, or both. Alcoholism, cirrhosis, diabetes, tuberculosis, cancer, prematurity, treatment with corticosteroids, cytotoxic drugs, prolonged use of intravenous antibiotics, intravenous drug abuse, granulocytopenia, and marrow hyperplasia are among the predisposing factors. Neonates are the first group of patients in whom haematogenously originated Candida arthritis can occur. The illness is a hospital acquired disease of sick children with underlying diseases such as the respiratory distress syndrome, and gastrointestinal defects. C albicans, which is responsible for more than 80% of the reported cases, and C tropicalis are the species responsible for this disease. Arthritis is usually present with accompanying metaphysial osteomyelitis. Bone infection might originate from the infected synovium or via the metaphysical vessels. Polyarthritis occurs in most patients and the knee is the joint most often affected. Arthritis originated by haematogenous dissemination beyond the neonatal period is usually a complication of disseminated candidiasis in patients with serious underlying disorders or intravenous drug abusers. C albicans is again the causative organism in about 80% of cases, and C tropicalis is responsible for most of the remaining cases. Two distinct clinical presentations can be observed: (a) acute onset of constitutional and synovial symptoms (about two thirds of patients), with the aetiological diagnosis established within the first week, and (b) indolent presentation, with mild systemic and arthritic symptoms, and delay in the diagnosis for months or years.

View this article in the Candida Library and download the Full Text PDF

Lookup the definition of Arthritis in the Glossary

See the Latest Articles in the Candida Library

Tag Cloud